University of Calgary
UofC Navigation

Interdisciplinary Sessions

Submitted by nicola.waugh on Tue, 04/11/2017 - 4:09pm

Involving Dancers and Musicians in Improvisation

Clinicians: Marie France Forcier, Robin Tufts 

To improvise is to allow oneself to engage with free play. For musicians and dancers alike, it is also to problem-solve, on the spot. In group-settings, to improvise requires trust, teamwork, and the ability to set aside inhibitions and judgment. In this session, Tufts and Forcier will guide the participants to practice structured improvisation as an interdisciplinary group, in preparation for an informal presentation during the lunch hour showcase. Participants are welcome to bring their own instruments.

Marie France Forcier draws on her extensive experience as a choreographer and artistic director of Forcier Stage Works in her career as Assistant Professor in Dance at the University of Calgary.  Over the past 15 years, her body of choreographic work has been commissioned across North America, Europe and Asia. She has toured extensively on four continents performing in disciplines ranging from performance art to family theatricals, to aerial circus to contemporary dance. Forcier is internationally active researcher in the field of Trauma Studies and continues to lead the way in developing new ways of thinking about the intersection of trauma and artistic practice.


Robin Tufts is a drummer, percussionist, improviser and dance accompanist.  Robin is very active in the Calgary jazz community, playing and recording with his own Trio Velocity, The Keith Smith Trio, The Lorna MacLachlan Group, The Northern Lights Jazz Quartet, Mapl, Andrea Petrity, and Mark DeJong. Other performing and accompanying credits include, the celtic group Seanachie, the klezmer band Klezmerovitz, flamenco guitarist Peter Knight, poet Sheri-d Wilson, Lynn Miles, Bob Day, Guido Basso, Alberta Ballet, Decidedly Jazz Dance, Dancers Studio West and Stage West. For 20 years, Robin has been the group leader of accompanists for the Program of Dance at the University of Calgary.

Interdisciplinary Improv Jam

Moderator: Adam Bell, Jeremy Brown, Val Campbell, Marie-France Forcier, Laura Hynes 

The Interdisciplinary Improv Jam features YOU! This year you will have the opportunity to practice structured improvisation as an interdisciplinary group for an informal jam session during the lunch hour.

The Interdisciplinary Improv Jam will be Friday, May 19 from 1:00 -1:20 p.m. in the Eckhardt-Gramatté Hall (Rozsa Centre).

Adam Patrick Bell is an Assistant Professor of Music Education in the School of Creative and Performing Arts at the University of Calgary. He has written many peer-reviewed articles (e.g. Journal of Music, Technology and Education, Journal on the Art of Record Production, International Journal of Education and the Arts, British Journal of Music Education, and Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education) and chapters (e.g. Oxford Handbook of Music Making and Leisure, Routledge Companion to Music, Technology, and Education) on the topics of music technology in music education, and disability in music education. Prior to his career in higher education, Adam worked as a kindergarten teacher, elementary music teacher, and support worker for adolescents with disabilities. Adam has also worked as a freelance producer, creating commercial music for clients including Coca-Cola.





Jeremy Brown is a renowned Canadian saxophonist, woodwind doubler, teacher, expert on the music of Henry Cowell and conductor. He is Professor of Music and the former Head of the Music Department at the University of Calgary. (1990-present)  He has also been an Artist-In-Residence and a visiting artist/lecturer at the Banff Centre.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Valerie Campbell is an educator, creative researcher, actor and director working in actor training and performance creation with a specialization in movement. She currently holds a tenured faculty position as an Associate Professor in the School of Creative and Performing Arts - Drama in the Faculty of Arts at the University of Calgary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marie France Forcier draws on her extensive experience as a choreographer and artistic director of Forcier Stage Works in her career as Assistant Professor in Dance at the University of Calgary.  Over the past 15 years, her body of choreographic work has been commissioned across North America, Europe and Asia. She has toured extensively on four continents performing in disciplines ranging from performance art to family theatricals, to aerial circus to contemporary dance. Forcier is internationally active researcher in the field of Trauma Studies and continues to lead the way in developing new ways of thinking about the intersection of trauma and artistic practice.



 A Fulbright scholar in Paris, coloratura soprano Laura Hynes spent six years abroad in France and Germany, performing repertoire ranging from baroque opera with Les Arts Florissants to "classical cabaret" on French television and radio. She has performed opera roles, solo recitals, one-woman shows, and concerts throughout Europe and the U.S., in venues including New York's Alice Tully Hall, the Barbican in London, and the Châtelet in Paris.

Dr. Hynes was the Carolyn Bailey & Dominick Argento Fellow at the University of Minnesota, where she earned her doctorate in 2013. 

Dr. Hynes is currently an Assistant Professor of Voice and Opera at the University of Calgary. Her research explores innovations in art song recital through social justice issues, community engagement, and interdisciplinary collaborative process.

Interdisciplinary Programming: Challenges and Opportunities, Panel and Discussion

Moderator: Bruce Barton
Panel Members: Laura Hynes, Marie France Forcier, Pil Hansen, Jean-Louis Bleau

The School of Creative and Performing Arts (SCPA) was formed in 2013 when Dance, Drama and Music were combined into a single academic unit. All three of the divisions continue to provide distinct disciplinary degree programs; however, the SCPA has also been exploring a range of interdisciplinary initiatives that are now possible because of the close physical and conceptual proximity of the three units. What is at stake in interdisciplinary programming? What kinds of opportunities do interdisciplinary collaborations provide for students and faculty? What are the most common challenges that emerge, and what sorts of solutions exist to address them? With interdisciplinary programming increasing at all levels within the Canadian education system, this panel and discussion will attempt to address these key questions of direct significance for educators preparing students for a quickly evolving educational landscape.

Bruce Barton is a performance maker and research/creation scholar located in Calgary, Alberta. His stage and radio plays have been produced across Canada, celebrated with regional and national awards, and anthologized. He works extensively as a director, playwright, dramaturg, and designer with numerous devising and intermedial performance companies across Canada and internationally. He is also the Artistic Director of Vertical City, an interdisciplinary performance hub. Recent Vertical City projects include 2YouTopia (Toronto's Nuit Blanch 2014), All Good Things (Toronto, Vancouver, Halifax 2013-14), and the award-winning Trace (Toronto 2014).

Bruce has published in a wide range of peer-reviewed and professional periodicals, and is a core member of Performance as Research Working Groups of the International Federation for Theatre Research (IFTR/FIRT) and the American Society for Theatre Research (ASTR), as well as a founding member of the Artistic Research Study Circle of the Nordic Summer University (NSU). He is also the co-ordinator of the Articulating Artistic Research Seminar at the Canadian Association for Theatre Research, which he began in 2012. Bruce has also been a member of the Playwrights Guild of Canada for over 15 years.
Bruce’s interdisciplinary orientation runs deep: he holds two Bachelor degrees, one in Literature and one in Fine Arts (Painting) from the University of Guelph. His Masters degree, also from the University of Guelph, is in Drama, and he received his Doctorate in Theatre and Film from the University of Toronto. Bruce taught performance creation, dramaturgy, intermedial performance, and practice-based research at the University of Toronto between 2001 and 2014. In January 2015 he became the first Director of the School of Creative and Performing Arts at the University of Calgary.